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Benefits of Palm Kernel Oil on Hair and Skin

Palm Kernel oil is known in Nigeria as Adin dudu amongst the Yoruba, Main Alaidi amongst the Hausa, Nmanu Aki or Eli Aki in Igbo, and Anwe Atahu to my people (Egbura). It is an edible plant oil extracted from the palm kernel, which is the seed found inside the palm fruit. The oil has a strong nutty scent and taste. It has been used by African mothers for centuries, to treat infections, prevent diseases, and for beautiful hair and skin.

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Palm Kernel oil can either be dark brown (black) or light yellow (or clear). The difference in the colour stems from the extraction process. The oil extracted via the cold press method is light yellow or clear, while the traditional heating method produces the dark brown coloured oil. In Nigeria, the most commonly found Palm Kernel oil is the dark brown.

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Palm Kernel oil is rich in lauric and myristic fatty acids. These give the oil antibiotic qualities and enhances the absorption of the oil into the skin and hair.

BENEFITS

Hair:

  • Soothes the hair and scalp when used as a hot oil treatment.
  • Thickens hair, giving it added volume.
  • Increases the softness and sheen of hair.
  • Looking for a great edge restorer and conditioner? Look no further ‘cause Palm Kernel oil is said to strengthen hair, thus preventing hair shedding or hair loss. It goes without saying that it also aids in hair growth.
  • Moisturises hair and is great in treating dandruff.

Skin:

  • Has anti-aging properties – Palm Kernel oil is loaded with antioxidants which prevents the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. It also provides protection against harmful UV rays, other toxins, and harsh weather conditions.
  • It is a great skin moisturiser, making the skin soft, smooth and supple.
  • Cures dry and itchy skin.
  • Restores skin elasticity.

There you have it. Palm Kernel oil seems to be a cosmetic wonder oil. I recently started adding it to my hair treatments (hot oil treatments and deep conditioner) and I’ve seen improvements in the texture of my hair. I’ve also used it to make a facial scrub and my skin didn’t revolt, which is a good sign. Since my skin liked it so much, I mixed a bit into my body oil mix.

You can get Palm Kernel oil in any market in Nigeria. If you are worried about getting the original oil, we’ve got you covered. If you’re in Abuja, you can always stop by our shop at Suite 203, Concept Plaza, 5th Avenue, Gwarimpa. We’ve got Palm Kernel oil, Coconut oil, Essential oils and a few other oils in stock.

Have you ever used Palm Kernel oil for your hair or skin? What were your results?

Moisturising my 4c, Multi-Porosity, Coily Hair: Kiki’s New Regimen

Keeping my hair moisturised has always been a challenge; a very BIG challenge. Even when my hair was relaxed, it was always very dry and straw-like.

It became harder to keep my hair moisturised after I dyed it. It got worse when the dye started growing out and I had to deal with 2-3 different porosity types on one head. Not funny at ALL! At some point, the work needed to maintain my healthy head of hair became too much and I practically gave up. I was too tired from work and life to have to deal with an unruly head of hair. The result? Breakage! I also developed a bit of dandruff and a serious case of itchy scalp. My hair began to thin in some places and it became very uneven.

It took a while for me to find a regimen which works for me. I’m still working on perfecting it, but so far, I’m loving the results.

So, what’s my new regimen?

  • Shampoo wash once a month – before each shamwash, I do a hot oil treatment. My current preferred oils are Jojoba, Palm Kernel, Black seed, Coconut and Fenugreek. I have been religious with my hot oil treatments because it ensures the shampoo process doesn’t dry out my hair. My shampoo is made of African black soap and a mix of oils.
  • Co-wash at least 2 times a month (I don’t have a particular product I use. Many times I just mix stuff up in my kitchen).
  • Because my hair easily dries out, moisturizing 2-3 times a week doesn’t work. I have to moisturize almost every day. I have also noticed moisturizing at night works best for me. So, I spritz in the morning then douse my hair with water when I shower at night. Lukewarm to warm water works best for me.
  • Using heat – Yes, you read that right. Using heat when deep conditioning works wonders on my hair. I have a heating cap which has become my best hair friend.

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  • Oil Deep Conditioning – My hair LOVES oil. Seriously, it LOVES oil. Many times i deep condition with oils alone and my hair is happy. The oils keep my hair from drying out and frizzing. I’ve also been adding Aloe Vera to my oil DCs, which dealt with the itchy scalp and dandruff issues.
  • LOC/LCO (liquid, oil, cream)- My process starts with water, followed by aloe vera gel, leave-in conditioner, oil mix and finally butter mix. My oil mix is made up of castor, glycerin, coconut, jojoba, grapeseed and lavendar oils. I use this as my stage one sealant before finally sealing with my butter (cocoa and shea butter) mix.
  • Green House Effect (GHE): This I try to do at least once a week. Sometimes I do it over night, but mostly when I wear traditional attire. I lightly spritz my hair, apply my oil mix, massaging it into my scalp, then cover with a shower cap. I wrap a scarf around it and leave for at least 10 hours (it doesn’t have to be so long oh! I just like the way my hair feels afterward; warm and soft). I follow the GHE with my sealing butter and I’m good to go.
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I couldn’t find my shower cap, so, plastic bag to the rescue!

There you have it. Did I say how much I love my current regimen? Since I revamped my regimen, I have noticed how much fuller and softer my hair is. Now to keep my hands outta my hair…. 🙂

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Clean, dandruff free scalp! Fuller, softer hair!

So, what’s your regimen and how’s it working for you?

 

 

DIY Oil Deep Conditioner with Aloe Vera

On Sunday, June 19, 2016, it was time to wash my hair. For the first time in a while, I didn’t dread the wash day process. In fact, I had planned it in such a way that the whole process wouldn’t take an entire day.

My hair was dry and my scalp was very itchy. Fortunately, there was no dandruff. Still, my scalp itched like madness! I decided to try a new treatment mix. Actually, it’s a twist on a mixture I have used several times successfully. This time though, I decided to tweak the recipe by replacing Coconut oil with Palm Kernel Oil and adding Grapeseed oil.

  • Cocoa Butter
  • A little Shea Butter
  • Palm Kernel
  • Honey
  • Aloe Vera Gel
  • Palm Oil
  • Safflower Oil
  • Grapeseed oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Fenugreek and Black Seed Oils
Fenugreek and Black Seed Oils

I had slept off the night before without moisturizing and using my satin scarf. I was that exhausted. So, my hair was extremely dry and frizzy. I did a hot oil treatment using a mixture of Palm Kernel Oil, Coconut oil and Grapeseed oil. I used my heating cap for 20 minutes then sham- washed with my black soap shampoo (my personal concoction). Ah, my hair and scalp felt so very clean.

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The Deep Conditioner: I heated the oil mixture a bit (warm, not hot oh!) and added Aloe Vera gel. I then applied the mixture to the sections of my hair from root to tip, taking extra care with the ends. I couldn’t find my shower cap so I used a plastic bag instead.  I left the mixture on my hair for about 45 minutes then rinsed with cold water and followed with a hibiscus rinse. Mehn, clean, soft hair is IT!

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My wash day

Since I’d used oils to deep condition, I didn’t bother oiling my hair again. I did seal my ends with a mixture of cocoa and shea butter though. Then I decided on a low manipulation style for the week. I ended up with 4 cornrows. Who knows? I just may end up keeping this style for the next two weeks. Yes, I’m lazy like that.

Have an awesome week everyone!

Kiki

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